CORPOREAL

spirits deities guides ancestors the other side of the veil
explore-blog:

Italo Calvino was offered the 1985–1986 term of the prestigious Charles Eliot Norton Professorship of Poetry at Harvard. He died weeks before he was scheduled to deliver his lectures, but working on them, his wife recalls, was the obsession of his final months. 
Calvino’s manuscripts for the lectures, in which he looks back on “the millennium of the book” and peers forward into what the future might hold for “the expressive, cognitive, and imaginative possibilities” of language and literature, were his last legacy. 
Here is Calvino’s enduring wisdom from the first lecture, a magnificent meditation on lightness. 

explore-blog:

Italo Calvino was offered the 1985–1986 term of the prestigious Charles Eliot Norton Professorship of Poetry at Harvard. He died weeks before he was scheduled to deliver his lectures, but working on them, his wife recalls, was the obsession of his final months.

Calvino’s manuscripts for the lectures, in which he looks back on “the millennium of the book” and peers forward into what the future might hold for “the expressive, cognitive, and imaginative possibilities” of language and literature, were his last legacy. 

Here is Calvino’s enduring wisdom from the first lecture, a magnificent meditation on lightness

magictransistor:

Jan Gossaert, Agony in the Garden (Oil on canvas), ca. 1510.

lapitiedangereuse:

“When art critics get together they talk about Form and Structure and Meaning. When artists get together they talk about where you can buy cheap turpentine.” 
― Pablo Picasso

lapitiedangereuse:

“When art critics get together they talk about Form and Structure and Meaning. When artists get together they talk about where you can buy cheap turpentine.” 

― Pablo Picasso

(via lecoledesfemmeslaurasfez)

Painter painting in our land pictures of only white angels
Painter painting in our time in shadows of yesterday

Painter, if you paint with love, paint me some black angels now
For all good blacks in heaven, painter show us that you care

Eartha Kitt - Angelitos Negros (1970 performance)

(Source: foxwin, via waterwhatever)

Requiescat

Tread lightly, she is near
Under the snow,
Speak gently, she can hear
The daisies grow.

All her bright golden hair
Tarnished with rust,
She that was young and fair
Fallen to dust.

Lily-like, white as snow,
She hardly knew
She was a woman, so
Sweetly she grew.

Coffin-board, heavy stone,
Lie on her breast,
I vex my heart alone
She is at rest.

Peace, Peace, she cannot hear
Lyre or sonnet,
All my life’s buried here,
Heap earth upon it.

—Oscar Wilde (via observando)

thetygre:

An umibozu, or sea bonze, the Priest of the Sea. A marine form of yokai (ghost/spirit) from Japanese folklore, the umibozu would rise from the ocean solely to terrify travelers. Their only defining characteristics were their blazing eyes and huge size; they could easily ‘stand’ over the mast of a ship. The umibozu were often blamed for storms, and some folklore states that they were the ghosts of holy men who died at sea. The only way to ward off the aquatic spirit was for a designated crew member of a ship to perform a holy dance. It is thought today that, like the similar European sea monks and sea bishops, the umibozu were inspired by sightings of giant squid and manta rays.

thetygre:

An umibozu, or sea bonze, the Priest of the Sea. A marine form of yokai (ghost/spirit) from Japanese folklore, the umibozu would rise from the ocean solely to terrify travelers. Their only defining characteristics were their blazing eyes and huge size; they could easily ‘stand’ over the mast of a ship. The umibozu were often blamed for storms, and some folklore states that they were the ghosts of holy men who died at sea. The only way to ward off the aquatic spirit was for a designated crew member of a ship to perform a holy dance. It is thought today that, like the similar European sea monks and sea bishops, the umibozu were inspired by sightings of giant squid and manta rays.